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“In the Caribbean we’d serve the local population, who are more than happy to have med students doing breast exams and blood pressure,” she recalls.

The Cornell students didn’t appear to have had any such hands-on experience.

Admissions aren’t as tough in these countries, but tuition can be jaw-dropping. George’s, for example, costs 0,000 for a four-year degree, compared to the ,000 it costs to attend the University of Toronto.

On top of that, most international medical graduates (known as IMGs) are unable to return home for several years after graduation, because—despite a doctor shortage—the number of residencies in Canada is tightly capped.

Dmytryshyn realized this when she started her clerkship at New York Methodist Hospital in Brooklyn.

What’s frustrating for many IMGs is that, even with the small chance of getting a spot, the equivalency process can be gruelling. Instead of a residency in La Belle Province, she says she’ll apply to work in New York after graduation from St.

In Quebec, equivalency includes both language tests and the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Exam (MCCEE), an advanced,

Dmytryshyn realized this when she started her clerkship at New York Methodist Hospital in Brooklyn.

What’s frustrating for many IMGs is that, even with the small chance of getting a spot, the equivalency process can be gruelling. Instead of a residency in La Belle Province, she says she’ll apply to work in New York after graduation from St.

In Quebec, equivalency includes both language tests and the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Exam (MCCEE), an advanced, $1,500 test that Canadian graduates don’t have to take. George’s, because she doesn’t want to take a year off to pass Quebec’s equivalency requirements for only a small chance at getting a spot. A lot of us want to go home, but they make it too hard.” Ko considered working in a rural area of Ontario in return for a residency spot (Quebec has no return of service program) but, much like Dmytryshyn, she doesn’t want to “be trapped for five years.” Schwarcz says he used to believe that Canadian provinces were unwelcoming to Canadians who studied medicine abroad because they perceived the quality of their graduates to be lower. George’s (where he was paid to teach a course), he believes the quality is the same.

Weeks later, he was called for an interview with the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI). But for students who see medicine as a calling, who can’t imagine doing anything else, there are other options. In August, she married her long-time partner, Byron Hyttenrauch, and the couple are planning a honeymoon in Tahiti.

Considering only one in five of the nearly 11,000 students who apply to medical schools across Canada each year are admitted, Dmytryshyn and Vakil are not alone. Six years after she got that fateful letter, Dmytryshyn is preparing to take over as chief resident of pediatrics at B. Meanwhile, Vakil is entering his fourth year of med school in Ireland with contacts at the Cleveland Clinic and the Mayo Clinic already in his address book.

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Dmytryshyn realized this when she started her clerkship at New York Methodist Hospital in Brooklyn.What’s frustrating for many IMGs is that, even with the small chance of getting a spot, the equivalency process can be gruelling. Instead of a residency in La Belle Province, she says she’ll apply to work in New York after graduation from St.In Quebec, equivalency includes both language tests and the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Exam (MCCEE), an advanced, $1,500 test that Canadian graduates don’t have to take. George’s, because she doesn’t want to take a year off to pass Quebec’s equivalency requirements for only a small chance at getting a spot. A lot of us want to go home, but they make it too hard.” Ko considered working in a rural area of Ontario in return for a residency spot (Quebec has no return of service program) but, much like Dmytryshyn, she doesn’t want to “be trapped for five years.” Schwarcz says he used to believe that Canadian provinces were unwelcoming to Canadians who studied medicine abroad because they perceived the quality of their graduates to be lower. George’s (where he was paid to teach a course), he believes the quality is the same.Weeks later, he was called for an interview with the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI). But for students who see medicine as a calling, who can’t imagine doing anything else, there are other options. In August, she married her long-time partner, Byron Hyttenrauch, and the couple are planning a honeymoon in Tahiti.Considering only one in five of the nearly 11,000 students who apply to medical schools across Canada each year are admitted, Dmytryshyn and Vakil are not alone. Six years after she got that fateful letter, Dmytryshyn is preparing to take over as chief resident of pediatrics at B. Meanwhile, Vakil is entering his fourth year of med school in Ireland with contacts at the Cleveland Clinic and the Mayo Clinic already in his address book.

,500 test that Canadian graduates don’t have to take. George’s, because she doesn’t want to take a year off to pass Quebec’s equivalency requirements for only a small chance at getting a spot. A lot of us want to go home, but they make it too hard.” Ko considered working in a rural area of Ontario in return for a residency spot (Quebec has no return of service program) but, much like Dmytryshyn, she doesn’t want to “be trapped for five years.” Schwarcz says he used to believe that Canadian provinces were unwelcoming to Canadians who studied medicine abroad because they perceived the quality of their graduates to be lower. George’s (where he was paid to teach a course), he believes the quality is the same.

Weeks later, he was called for an interview with the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI). But for students who see medicine as a calling, who can’t imagine doing anything else, there are other options. In August, she married her long-time partner, Byron Hyttenrauch, and the couple are planning a honeymoon in Tahiti.

Considering only one in five of the nearly 11,000 students who apply to medical schools across Canada each year are admitted, Dmytryshyn and Vakil are not alone. Six years after she got that fateful letter, Dmytryshyn is preparing to take over as chief resident of pediatrics at B. Meanwhile, Vakil is entering his fourth year of med school in Ireland with contacts at the Cleveland Clinic and the Mayo Clinic already in his address book.

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“Then I got one letter and my dreams were crushed,” says Dmytryshyn, now 30.